Costa Rica Sets Carbon Neutral Goal

By |2017-03-15T22:01:13-06:00March 8th, 2017|@enable_change, Sustainability|

Costa Rica plans to be a carbon neutral country by the time it marks its bicentennial in 2021. And the Central American nation is not so far from that ambition — already 98 percent of its electricity comes from renewables.Read the full article at: www.renewableenergyworld.com In the midst of political discourse and disagreement over the validity of the science behind global warming, it is refreshing to see a country determinedly act to further its use of renewable energy. Costa Rica has managed to do what other democratic countries struggle to achieve; that is, identify a problem, determine a solution, establish a goal and take actions to accomplish it. At the opening of Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week, Costa Rica’s president Luis Guillermo Solis announced plans for “Costa Rica to be a carbon neutral country by the time it marks its bicentennial in 2021.” Carbon neutral. That’s huge even for a small country like Costa Rica. In fact, that’s huge for any entity – a city or a community. It’s huge even for an individual. Really, it’s just plain huge at any level. Costa Rica already gets 98% of its electricity from “renewables…mainly hydropower but also geothermal, wind, solar and biomass. The only fossil fuel it utilizes is diesel.” Yet, they continue to raise the bar. Solis said that Costa Rica’s decision to embrace renewables “ ‘was in no way improvised — it’s the constitutional right of the people to enjoy a clean environment.’ ” Right.

How to create IT innovation

By |2019-08-27T16:40:18-06:00March 7th, 2017|@enable_change, IT Strategy & Implementation, Leader Change Capability, Leadership and Management|

Exclusive research from the CIO Executive Council shines a light on how IT leaders are defining and driving IT innovation. Register now to download the free report.This research article has some interesting insights into the thinking and beliefs around defining and driving IT innovation. The principles they discuss are relevant, not just for IT, but for any organization trying to develop a culture of innovation. As mentioned in the article, “Innovation is change”. To be successful, leaders have to be change agents and develop a culture of trust, transparency and flexibility. Read the full article at: www.cio.com

The Firm of the Future Part 2

By |2017-03-15T21:58:42-06:00March 2nd, 2017|@enable_change|

We’re beginning to see what the next generation of successful companies will look like.Read the full article at: www.bain.com Hello, business leaders. Check out the last part of this article. It’s talking directly to you. “Leading and working in a firm of the future will feel different. It will sometimes feel as if you are venture capitalists…Other aspects will feel like a professional services firm… And still other aspects will feel more similar to a scale start-up…” Hmmm…interesting. Got your attention? In our blog on Monday, we talked about business changes the authors predict will come by 2027. They conclude that business is shifting from shareholders (“shareholder primacy” in place since the ‘70’s) to focus on customers and employees. “Jack Ma, founder and executive chairman of Alibaba Group, puts it clearly: ‘Customers are No. 1, employees are No. 2, and shareholders are No. 3.’ “ The effect of this (and other influences discussed in the article) is “the biggest change in business since the 1970s. The fundamental goals of strategy will not change: Companies will still win by achieving a lower or better cost position, delivering superior customer experiences, or controlling an industry standard. But virtually every element of how firms pursue these strategic goals will look quite different.” And here’s where it impacts you, the leaders. “Putting all this in place will be a profound leadership challenge. At an organizational level, many new capabilities will be needed: new technology assets and skills, new deals for talent, new and expanded types of partnerships, new managerial tools and metrics, new balance sheet approaches. At an individual level, leaders will need to evolve their own skills, shifting from management to inspiration and coaching, adding value through enabling the mission-critical roles rather than controlling information flows, building strong cultures not just within the firm but with partners as well. They will also need to guide their people through the mother of all change-management journeys. “Previous shifts in eras have seen more failures to adapt than success stories of navigating the transition. Many companies have done it once or twice (IBM, Coca-Cola, Goldman Sachs), and firms such as GE and Nestlé have done it as many as three times. But these shifts are rare enough that most leaders have no direct experience with them…” Still got your attention? Contact us and we can help you understand and prepare for the leadership challenges that await you in the changing business world.

The Firm of the Future Part 1

By |2017-03-05T20:07:21-07:00February 27th, 2017|@enable_change|

We’re beginning to see what the next generation of successful companies will look like.Read the full article at: www.bain.com It’s hard to beat a thoughtful, well-researched and well-written Bain article. In this one, three Bain partners offer studied conclusions about what companies will be doing and how they will be doing it in 2027. They offer substance to be considered. And, reflecting the current business trend toward customer intimacy the authors discuss, this article is packaged to appeal to the individual reader with her/his unique reading and learning style. You enjoy reading on a screen? Like interactive presentation? Just scroll on down. Want to hold paper in your hands? You can print the PDF. Love graphics? Prefer video? Got you covered. It’s all about you. It’s the perfect framework to drive home the main point of the article: that business is shifting its focus from keeping shareholders happy to keeping customers and employees happy. “The prevailing paradigm that has underpinned business for the past 50 years is under review. The simplest version of that paradigm is that firms exist first and foremost to deliver returns to their shareholders’ capital—and the sooner they deliver it, the better.” The authors call this the “shareholder primacy” era. This contrasts to today’s trends where “younger employees, along with many older ones, also want to work for a company that pursues a higher purpose in addition to profits…Jack Ma, founder and executive chairman of Alibaba Group, puts it clearly: ‘Customers are No. 1, employees are No. 2, and shareholders are No. 3.’ Even Jack Welch, the shareholder primacy era’s greatest maestro as CEO of General Electric, has more recently reflected, ‘Shareholder value is a result, not a strategy…Your main constituencies are your employees, your customers and your products.’ ” The effect? A “profound shift in eras, which, over the next 10 years, will result in the biggest change in business since the 1970s. The fundamental goals of strategy will not change: Companies will still win by achieving a lower or better cost position, delivering superior customer experiences, or controlling an industry standard. But virtually every element of how firms pursue these strategic goals will look quite different.” The article goes on to identify and discuss five areas of difference: “scale and customer intimacy; professional managers vs. mission-critical roles; assets vs. ecosystems; capital gets a reset; and Engine 1, Engine 2.” At the end of each difference is a summary, “What this could look like in 2027.” This is good stuff. It is difficult to think there is an engaged business leader (or business person) who wouldn’t find these insights highly valuable. Contact us and we can help you prepare for, manage, and potentially capitalize on the likely changes coming to the business world.

‘Returnships’ Might Help Solve Your Company’s Gender Diversity Problem

By |2019-02-20T15:59:14-07:00February 23rd, 2017|@enable_change|

There's a huge pool of untapped talent out there. Here's how to find it--and put it to work.Read the full article at: www.inc.com Regardless if you are the woman who took time off to raise children or care for aging parents or if you are married to the woman (or man) who has, you know that re-entering the workforce after an extended absence can be a daunting task. " ‘As an industry, we can't afford to overlook women who have taken time away to raise families,’ " says Steven Aldrich, chief product officer at GoDaddy, one of six companies partnering with nonprofit Path Forward to launch re-entry programs. ‘There are thousands of talented women who are more than capable of pursuing fulfilling careers, but have a hard time returning to work because of a resume gap.’ ” It is worth noting that while returnships “are often billed as a way to recruit women, who are more likely to take time off for personal reasons than men,” they are open to both men and women. The returnship is an internship-like program for workers who are returning to the workforces after being absent for an extended time. According to Carol Fishman Cohen, CEO of Boston-based career re-entry firm iRelaunch, “The internship-like experience is similar to a contract consulting role, special project, or temp job--any short term, non-binding arrangement…We are hiring a communications specialist as a re-entry intern for three months. If both parties are happy with the arrangement, the person will continue on in a permanent role." A cursory online search shows that a good number of companies offer returnships. This article, as the title states, offers suggestions on how to start such a program. Whether you are looking for a job or looking to start a program, this is a good nugget of current job market information. Contact us and we can help you analyze and better understand if you and your company are taking considering all options for finding talent.

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