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The moral dilemmas of the Fourth Industrial Revolution – World Economic Forum

By | 2017-07-15T01:24:54+00:00 July 12th, 2017|@enable_change|

Should your driverless car value your life over a pedestrian’s? Should your Fitbit activity be used against you in a court case? Should we allow drones to become the new paparazzi? Can one patent a…Read the full article at: medium.com In the opening paragraph of this article, the authors pose the questions they want the world to answer: “Should your driverless car value your life over a pedestrian’s? Should your Fitbit activity be used against you in a court case? Should we allow drones to become the new paparazzi? Can one patent a human gene?” Each question could be answered with a “yes” or “no,” but these are not simple yes-no questions. These are weighty inquiries into the impact of technology and artificial intelligence (AI) on our lives, and they beg for serious global discussion. Scientists, educators, business leaders and others are attempting to start that discussion. “…Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk and other experts signed an open letter calling for efforts to ensure AI is beneficial to society: “ ‘The potential benefits are huge, since everything that civilization has to offer is a product of human intelligence; we cannot predict what we might achieve when this intelligence is magnified by the tools AI may provide, but the eradication of disease and poverty are not unfathomable. Because of the great potential of AI, it is important to research how to reap its benefits while avoiding potential pitfalls.’ ” Vinayak Dalmia and Kavi Sharma in this article published by the World Economic Forum, offer a proposal: “There is a need for a structured international forum to form a list of technologies that need governance, to evaluate each technology and release a blueprint for its code of conduct. For example, an international governmental body could lay down specific rules such as making it mandatory to release the logic behind certain AI algorithms…” (The authors point to such technologies as genetic editing, AI, social media, robots.) “If we do not prepare in advance, we face several risks. We risk losing tremendous power to machines. We risk altering the course of humanity without fully understanding the consequences. We risk creating massive inequality between the “techno super-rich” and a large underclass…” “Traditionally, technology progress outpaces the political process: we already missed drafting the moral charter for the internet, and continue to play catch up till this day. We cannot afford to be blind-sided by the next frontiers, be it in biotechnology or AI. Our future is increasingly being scripted by engineers and entrepreneurs, who are not necessarily being held to account.” There is irony here. Human intelligence created artificial intelligence, and now we must create laws to protect our society from these creations. And how do we do this? The suggestion is that we gather together, we talk and we try to govern. How very human. Contact us and we can help you better understand how advances in technology and artificial intelligence might impact your company.